Posted

Virtually every interview ends with the interviewer asking if you have any questions. It’s partially an opportunity for you to get clarification. It’s mostly a test that many interviewees don’t handle well. The interviewer wants some sign that you’ve looked into the company or industry and plan on sticking around.

So, here are some questions that will leave your interviewer impressed.

 

How Do You Measure Success for this Role?

Too often, a candidate with experience in a similar role assumes they know what’s important in a role. This question tells your interviewer that you understand that different companies prioritize different job functions. It also gives you a chance to see if the company has thought through the position. If they have, the interviewer will be able to provide you with a definite answer about how they evaluate success for the role.

Takeaway: Never assume you know what job functions matter at a new company.

Can You Describe the Culture Here in One Sentence?

Culture fit is one of the factors that make people stick with a job or quit. Say that a company culture focuses on hard work and hard play. If you’re a low-key personality, you’ll likely hate working in a culture like that. This question tells the interviewer that you understand that company culture matters.

Takeaway: Sometimes, you may have to take a job at a company with a culture you don’t like. If you can avoid it, though, you should.

What Advancement Opportunities Does Your Company Offer?

Many candidates only plan to work for a year or two at the companies where they interview. They don’t ask about advancement opportunities because they don’t care. They assume they’ll move on to a higher position or better-paying position somewhere else. Asking about advancement options tells the interviewer that you are interested in working for their company in the long-term.

Takeaway: Letting the interviewer know you plan on sticking around can make you a more attractive candidate than someone with a better resume.

 

Don’t let the opportunity to ask a question catch you off guard or leave your interviewer unimpressed. Ask relevant questions about the role, the evaluation process, or the company culture. Ask about advancement. These kinds of questions tell the interviewer that you see the position as more than just a job you’ll quit in a year or two. That makes you a better candidate in their eyes.

Think you’re ready to tackle the end of interview questions? GPS can help get you in the room with companies that want your skills.

 

find your fit with us

 

Leave a Reply

  • (will not be published)